Sep. 15th, 2016

highlyeccentric: A photo of myself, around 3, "reading" a Miffy book (Read Miffy!)
This may be the last of the weekly posts - I expect I'll slow down a lot once semester hits next week. Sorry for lack of other posts - conference happened, then my computer had to go into the shop (again) for water damage, and generally, stuff happened.

What are you reading now:
The Epistemology of the Closet, which continues interesting.
Why are Faggots So Afraid of Faggots, which is *mostly* interesting but some of the contributions are quite meh.
Crown of Midnight, Sarah J Maas, which is slower and more weighty reading than the first in the series.
Best Australian Poetry 2015, which has poems in it, funny that.
Glenarvon, but I haven't picked it up in a while.

For work:
The Sense of an Ending, (Kermode) which is... odd. Very sixties, but relevant to my interests.

On the intertubes, I've also been reading bits and pieces from Overland, the newly opened Femme Feminism, and, within the constraints of one-free-article-a-week, The Saturday Paper. Daily Life has been swallowed up by the SMH Life and Style, so I needed new sources of actually intelligent writing.

Recently Finished:

The Price of SaltThe Price of Salt by Patricia Highsmith

My rating: 4 of 5 stars


This was really very *literary*, which I didn't expect. I know the only reason it was published as pulp was teh lezbianz contenz, but still. Very literary. Different from the film, but in ways that largely made sense as strategic choices on the part of the filmmaker. I think I found Therese's character much more likable here, though - I see why the film changed her career from 'actual stage designer' to 'wannabe photographer', but I think it lost something in reducing those aspects of her character. For a start, it is much clearer in the novel that Therese is capable of existing as a functional adult without Carol.

On the other hand, the novel has a whole lot of Freudian WOW. The hot milk scene was a, a thing. Definitely a thing.

Interestingly, in the light of complaints that the film contained no men who were not shit, the novel does! Men who are not shit exist. They are useful at times.



Throne of Glass (Throne of Glass, #1)Throne of Glass by Sarah J. Maas

My rating: 4 of 5 stars


I'm really not sure about shelving this with 'childrens-and-ya-fantasy'. It's sold as YA, apparently, but in the way that the YA genre has aged up a LOT recently. And taken in the refugee 'romance fantasy' genre that got elbowed out of standard fantasy by GOT look-alikes.

In short: this is a wild ride, and so many of my favourite fantasy tropes all in one place. A+, good work.



The Assassin and the Pirate Lord (Throne of Glass, #0.1)The Assassin and the Pirate Lord by Sarah J. Maas

My rating: 3 of 5 stars


Eh, okay. Serves its function as a prequel. If you actually read this first it would dispel some of the character arc in the first novel, but on the other hand, there are whole lines of tension that only make sense if you have the information given as backstory in the novel. This is relevant to my professional interests.



What will you read next?
My boss' book on gestures is a relatively urgent read. For funsies... I am anxiously awaiting the arrival of my copy of Meanjin. Bring it to meeee!

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